Projects

Lesotho

The kingdom of Lesotho is a small landlocked country entirely surrounded by South Africa. It is known as the Mountain Kingdom, the whole country being over 1,000 metres in altitude. The country’s lowest point of 1,400 metres above sea level is the highest lowest point of any country in the world. In 2014 43% of the population were children under the age of five. Diseases such as HIV and AIDS have helped to contribute to the high percentage of orphans in Lesotho as well as absenteeism among teachers. 100% of public schools have a school feeding programme to cater for children who are orphaned, vulnerable or from a poor background. (UNICEF)

Malawi

Malawi is hemmed in on all sides by other, bigger neighbours - Mozambique to the east, south and south-east; Zambia to the west; and by Tanzania to the east and north-east. A fifth of Malawi is water. Malawi remains one of the least developed nations in the world, and national and regional literacy tests have shown that Malawian students rank among the lowest in the sub-Saharan African region. With a ratio of 80 pupils for every one teacher, and sometimes 100 children to a classroom, Malawi currently suffers from a lack of educational infrastructure and resources. Educated women in Malawi are less likely to marry early and more likely to have smaller and healthier families. More educated women send their children to school and protect them from undernutrition, HIV infection, trafficking and sexual exploitation. (UNICEF)

Tanzania

Tanzania’s population of 55.5 million includes around 120 different African tribal groups. Many of its people live below the World Bank poverty line, with 90 percent of Tanzanians living in rural areas and living off what they can grow on the land. In 2007, the country achieved nearly universal access to primary education. However, since then, enrolment of primary school-aged children has been dropping. Girls, the poorest children, children with disabilities and children living in under-served communities are most vulnerable to dropping out of school, or worse never attending. Access to pre-primary education is very low and the poor quality of education dampens children’s prospects of a productive future. (UNICEF)

South Africa

Out of the 4 countries in which School Aid operates you probably know more facts about South Africa than any of the others. But perhaps you didn’t know that there are 11 official languages and it completely surrounds both Swaziland and Lesotho. South Africa spends a bigger share of its gross domestic product on education than any other country in Africa. However, in a league table of education systems drawn up in 2015 by the OECD club of mainly rich countries, South Africa ranks 75th out of 76. South Africa has the most unequal school system in the world, says Nic Spaull of the University of Stellenbosch. The gap in test scores between the top 20% of schools and the rest is wider than in almost every other country. (The Economist)

Lesotho

The kingdom of Lesotho is a small landlocked country entirely surrounded by South Africa. It is known as the Mountain Kingdom, the whole country being over 1,000 metres in altitude. The country’s lowest point of 1,400 metres above sea level is the highest lowest point of any country in the world. In 2014 43% of the population were children under the age of five. Diseases such as HIV and AIDS have helped to contribute to the high percentage of orphans in Lesotho as well as absenteeism among teachers. 100% of public schools have a school feeding programme to cater for children who are orphaned, vulnerable or from a poor background. (UNICEF)

Malawi

Malawi is hemmed in on all sides by other, bigger neighbours - Mozambique to the east, south and south-east; Zambia to the west; and by Tanzania to the east and north-east. A fifth of Malawi is water. Malawi remains one of the least developed nations in the world, and national and regional literacy tests have shown that Malawian students rank among the lowest in the sub-Saharan African region. With a ratio of 80 pupils for every one teacher, and sometimes 100 children to a classroom, Malawi currently suffers from a lack of educational infrastructure and resources. Educated women in Malawi are less likely to marry early and more likely to have smaller and healthier families. More educated women send their children to school and protect them from undernutrition, HIV infection, trafficking and sexual exploitation. (UNICEF)

South Africa

Out of the 4 countries in which School Aid operates you probably know more facts about South Africa than any of the others. But perhaps you didn’t know that there are 11 official languages and it completely surrounds both Swaziland and Lesotho. South Africa spends a bigger share of its gross domestic product on education than any other country in Africa. However, in a league table of education systems drawn up in 2015 by the OECD club of mainly rich countries, South Africa ranks 75th out of 76. South Africa has the most unequal school system in the world, says Nic Spaull of the University of Stellenbosch. The gap in test scores between the top 20% of schools and the rest is wider than in almost every other country. (The Economist)

Tanzania

Tanzania’s population of 55.5 million includes around 120 different African tribal groups. Many of its people live below the World Bank poverty line, with 90 percent of Tanzanians living in rural areas and living off what they can grow on the land. In 2007, the country achieved nearly universal access to primary education. However, since then, enrolment of primary school-aged children has been dropping. Girls, the poorest children, children with disabilities and children living in under-served communities are most vulnerable to dropping out of school, or worse never attending. Access to pre-primary education is very low and the poor quality of education dampens children’s prospects of a productive future. (UNICEF)